INDUSTRY LACKS PROFESSIONALISM, SAYS PROHGRES

PROHGRES

Industry lacks professionalism, says Prohgres




Recording artiste Prohgres believes professionalism has been hampering the progress of the local music industry.

According to the reggae artiste, who is promoting a record titled ‘Memory Lane‘, despite the few successes that dancehall and reggae music have achieved on the Billboard charts in recent times, both genres could have been further ahead.

“To compete with international acts, it comes right back around to professionalism and thinking of the music as a business. We, as local acts, have to put more time and effort into the creation, promotion and marketing of our product,” he said. “One of our major problems is that we, as artistes, sometimes try to do everything on our own, meaning we try to manage, produce, publish, promote and market ourselves.”

Stop being selfish

He said that international acts have persons employed to do that for them so they can focus more on being great artistes.

“Maybe I am wrong, but I think the first step that we could take on being more competitive with international acts is to let each person play their right roles and stop being selfish. That is why when foreigners use our same music, they achieve more than us because of the level of professionalism that is employed to sell their work,” he said.

Prohgres also believes getting caught up with the ‘star life’ can be counter-productive.

“We need to take the music like a business and focus less on the act of getting famous. We, as artistes and producers, need to take the time out to learn more about the music business and not just music itself. I have witnessed music from the Latin market rocking up to two billion views in just a couple of months while our reggae or dancehall music can barely reach 20 million views. So I think we need to start do some research and then try to change our approach towards music marketing and promotion then we will be able to improve our sales,” he said.

Prohgres’ Memory Lane was produced by Big Laugh Music and Sasaine Music Records. He says the response has been overwhelming.

“Persons from all over have been reaching out to let me know that my music gives them hope and the drive to push forward,” he told THE WEEKEND STAR.

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